What’s a Wellness Retreat Holiday Anyway?


Well, think of it like your personal escape from the chaos of everyday life. It’s that magical place where you can finally take a breather, kick back, and find some peace and quiet. In other words, it’s your chance to hit pause on the daily grind and get in touch with your inner Zen. Life can seem a little crazy at times. Wellness retreats are like a secret hideaway where you can slow down, chill out, and rediscover yourself. The wellness retreat at Raven’s Perch has a little something for everyone. Whether you’re into yoga, meditation, detoxing, getting massages, or just doing some soul-searching, we’ve got you covered. It’s all about customizing the experience to fit your needs and wants.

Are you juggling a high-stress job, taking care of elderly parent(s), and teens while also trying to get to the gym, or visit with friends. While we may enjoy most of these activities on their own, thrown all together it can be overwhelming and hard to find time to relax. We’ve become accustomed to cramming every moment of our schedules so tightly that the idea of having spare time can trigger anxiety. What thoughts or emotions might arise when we find ourselves in a moment of tranquility without any distractions?

But this is the wonderful thing about retreats, it is all about embracing free time. It’s a chance to unplug, unwind, and disconnect from your phone! This is your golden opportunity to recharge, reflect, and have a heart-to-heart chat with yourself. No guilt about lazing around here. It’s a guilt-free zone to catch up on sleep, explore, read, write, draw, or just have a deep convo with your inner guru, asking, “What’s going on in there?”

So, what makes a Wellness Retreat Holiday different from your typical vacation?
Think about your past vacations… There’s the one where you lounge on the beach all day, another filled with non-stop sightseeing, and maybe even a shopping spree or two. These vacations are great, no doubt about it. But what sets a wellness retreat apart is what happens after you’ve packed your bags and gone back to reality.

After a wellness retreat, you don’t just come back feeling relaxed; you come back as a changed person, from the inside out. It’s not about superficial experiences; it’s about those deep, transformative moments.

And how does that happen, you ask?
Well, during a retreat, you get the time and space to rest and rejuvenate. But you also dive into activities that help you release stress, unlock hidden thoughts and emotions, and discover the root of your exhaustion. It’s a journey of self-reflection, moments of clarity, and those “aha” epiphanies that can change the trajectory of your life.

So, when should you start thinking about booking a wellness retreat?
It’s time to consider one if any of these sound familiar:
– You wake up tired most days
– Stress is your constant companion from work, life, or relationships
– You’re thinking about a career change but can’t see the path
– Life feels like it’s stuck on repeat, and you’re craving direction
– Recent tough times have left you in need of healing and space
– You’ve got that itch to find your life’s purpose
– You’re on a quest for your passions and a deeper understanding of yourself
– You’re all about improving your health and boosting your energy
– You’re standing at a crossroads, unsure of where to go next in life

So, what can a Wellness Retreat Holiday do for you?
– You’ll leave feeling refreshed and recharged
– You’ll gain insights into your life’s path and purpose
– It’s like a mental and emotional detox, releasing all those blockages
– You’ll create new healthy daily routines
– It’s a kick start for your physical well-being, finding ways to stay healthy when you’re back home
– You’ll reconnect with your inner emotions and let them flow
– You’ll see your life from a whole new perspective
– Maybe you’ll even discover new ways to express your true self

In a nutshell, while a wellness retreat won’t magically change your external circumstances, it will give you a fresh outlook on the world. It’s like a gift to yourself, a chance to learn, and an adventure into your inner self. So, what are you waiting for? Time to book that retreat and start your journey!

Life can be a challenge, find peace through healing retreats

Following on from my previous post about going with the flow and allowing plans to unfold and evolve as they need to… one of the ideas that we had originally been drawn to was to build a healing retreat on the property. The reality of the cost of building and of how we ended up utilizing the 5 acres made that idea fall away. Too many obstacles that we were unable to see past.

So, we let the idea rest. But the dream, the thought, kept nudging at my heart and my mind. Everywhere, I see the need for people to step out of their lives for even just a short while, to gain perspective, to have space to think and ground and heal – mind, body, emotion. We have many guests who tell us that they came to our out of the way little tiny home rental to take a break from work, from the weight of family commitments and just simply the burdens of life.

Very recently a young woman arrived for a month long stay. When I first met her I must admit I was concerned for her overall health. I welcomed her but just had a sense that I needed to let her be. A few days after she arrived she emerged from the rental and we had a chat. She was very open and expressed how she was dealing with many levels of trauma. I allowed her the space to talk. I mostly listened but when asked I would share thoughts and suggestions based on my own experience.

I suggested that she utilize everything that we and our property had to offer including the sauna, the sweet old claw foot bathtub, the forest, and the peaceful environment. I also suggested that she seek local health practitioners to help guide her on her journey. I witnessed her progress throughout the month and it was like watching a rose unfurl. When she got in her car to drive away and on to the next part of her journey to discover her Self and where her life path needed to go, she was a changed person. Still a seemingly fragile and delicate young woman but beneath that – a person who had had the strength and willingness to be completely vulnerable and alone – what I saw was a peaceful warrior, strong and ready to face life once more.

I am passionate about the healing journey and sharing not only my offerings but also the talents of practitioners here in the valley. I offer several yoga classes at Bindu Studio as well as personalized healing meditations, Yoga Nidra, and hands on spiritual healing at the health studio on our property.

A dream of mine has been to create private healing retreats at The Nest vacation rental to provide anywhere from 3 to 30 day long private healing retreats for one to two people at a time.

The concept is still being developed but essentially I work with guests to develop a unique and personal time for healing. Together, we build a plan for your stay depending on your needs and intentions for your retreat. You will be able to choose services from myself and health practitioners as mentioned above to support your healing journey.

Everything from minimal interactions with us but access to healing services as listed above (as well as the sauna) to lots of interactions including assistance with food prep, guidance with tools and techniques to build your optimal day that you can carry with you once you’ve finished your retreat. Or, somewhere in between, if you imagine it, let’s work together to make it happen!

If you are interested in more information please reach out, I’d be happy to talk more about this offering at Raven’s Perch with you.

In closing, here are some words from our guest who I spoke of above; she kindly wrote this testimonial of sorts for this post:

What a wonderfully restorative time! I stumbled across this listing on AirBnB – and it feels like a stroke of luck to have found a perfect little home, tucked away in the mountains. Not only did it meet my expectations – it exceeded them. Martha and Steve are incredibly welcoming and were able to offer a variety of services around the space itself, but the town of Winlaw in itself has many restorative practitioners and activities as well.
To be a bit more vulnerable, I drove into town feeling lost, un-rooted, and unwell. I made use of chiropractic, somatic massage therapy, yoga, sauna and time spent in nature itself to re-centre and re-ground. I loved how fresh the organic foods grown around the area were, and natural mineral water came straight from the tap too. I left feeling rejuvenated and re-energized to tackle life’s hurdles and changes of season again. – Melodi F.

How we use the wisdom of the Stoics to embrace the unknown, and go with the flow


When we embarked on this journey at Raven’s Perch we had a somewhat different image of how it would be. We had pictured a community of tiny homes on the lower area of the property along with a farm. Up top a few more dwellings including our home and the vacation rental. Some of these things came to fruition and some began to take shape but then evaporated into the ether due to arising circumstances.

Through the creation of our vision for this property and how we want to build our life in this small mountain community, we have remained relatively steadfast and continue to move forward despite the obstacles that come our way. When things become cloudy or when the path takes a sudden turn we seem to always return to stoicism for inspiration and strength to keep going.

Don’t seek for everything to happen as you wish it would, but rather wish that everything happens as it actually will. Then your life will flow well.

The Epictetus quote above reminds us to guard against having rigid expectations or desires for everything to go exactly as you want. It acknowledges that life is unpredictable, and trying to force things to conform to our wishes can lead to disappointment and frustration.

Instead of imposing our desires onto reality, this quote encourages us to cultivate a mindset of acceptance and openness. It means embracing the circumstances, events, and outcomes as they naturally occur, without resistance or attachment to specific outcomes.

By adopting this perspective, the statement suggests that we will experience a sense of ease and harmony in life. When you let go of excessive control and surrender to the natural flow of life, you may find greater peace, contentment, and resilience in the face of challenges. In summary, this quote encourages a more flexible and accepting approach to life. By aligning your wishes with the unfolding reality, rather than trying to mould reality to fit your wishes, you may find greater peace and well-being.

So, while that dream of building a tiny home community is no longer a reality, we are watching an amazing permaculture farm take form. Emerald Grove is evolving beautifully under Ryan’s very capable hands. To watch the once empty field turn into a productive 1/2 acre working farm is incredible. The farm is Ryan’s blank canvas and he is the artist! Every day we are grateful for his presence and excited to see it all unfolds.

What has evolved is even better than what we had expected or intended. It’s been a great learning experience on many levels and as we continue to evolve our future plans it’s a quote that I’ll make sure to keep close at hand as a reminder.

Is there something in your life at the moment that you are trying to control or direct? How would it be if you would surrender to the flow and allow it to be what it needs to be. Could you accept an outcome other than what you’ve created in your mind? Just a thought to consider, to contemplate. Imagine that “thing” as a leaf on a flowing river and let it go without any expectation. You may be very pleased and surprised at the outcome!

Emerald Grove – Permaculture Farm

We are very excited this spring because so much is starting to happen on our lower field. Through the Young Agrarian land-matching program we joined with a young farmer, Ryan, who will live and work the land and build his own farming business. I’m going to invite him to share content on this website and through blog posts in the coming months but for now I wanted to write a quick post since it’s been oh so long. Winter was a busy time planning and now that spring is here we are putting into action all of our collective ideas.

Ryan is starting with 1/4 acre this year to get things going but has a design worked out that includes increasing the farm to 1/2 acre next year as well as incorporating a forest garden around the perimeter of the farm. We are excited to watch the progress as he hones his skills and builds his knowledge.

Steve and I are taking care of basic clean up and getting the well and electric down to the lower property. We’ve got the wood to mill and all of those branches to chip up for use on garden pathways.

That’s all for now, much more to come!

Ryan adding manure to the 1/4 acre section
A small grove of cedars was removed to allow more light into the field during winter. The lumber will be used for projects on the property!

Let’s Talk Poop

I’ve spent my whole life until now living in places that were hooked up to city sewage systems so I’ve never had a reason or desire to understand how a septic system works.  Living in cities we don’t think about this kind of s#!t … we pour it, dump it, flush it and forget about it.  Well, unless you live in Victoria where we’re reminded often that we are flushing our poop (among other things) into the ocean (though thankfully that’s now changing with a new raw sewage filtration plant at the mouth of the harbor).  

So, now that I watched a septic system being installed and I’ll be living with this thing, I want to understand how it works.  I want to understand how to maintain it and what actually happens down there underground, in the tank and in the field.

It was great having a chance to peer into the tank before it was mostly buried.  It looked spotlessly clean – it made me wonder about all the things you could use it for (before it gets used for what it is meant, of course).

A hot tub, a fish tank? As the installer was explaining all the parts to us, he proceeded to show me the filter that I will apparently need to pull up from time to time to hose it off … 

Um… to… WHAT? I have do that? Ha ha… you’re joking, right? Nope, no joking. I think I’ll hire someone to do it.  Going rural, I guess there’s a lot of that sort of thing I’ll have to get used to – cleaning out chicken coops will be another fun adventure … more poop… 

Maintaining a safe and clean septic system is a very important part about living unattached to the city sewerage system.

I did a bit of research and found a site that discussed the best toilet paper to use.  Don’t use anything too robust, they say, as it will likely sink to the bottom of the tank and build up over time – that definitely doesn’t sound good. 

This resource gives a good selection of TP to use and includes pros and cons – who knew there was so much to consider about TP? I mean, yah, I have my favourite types based on feel – nothing feels good about sand paper down there, or the kind that basically disintegrates in your hands while you’re using it, yuck.

Basically it’s good to remember that nothing goes down the toilet except for toilet paper – NOTHING – no Kleenex, paper towels, baby wipes, tampons, kitty litter etc.  Just the right kind of toilet paper. Those leftovers in the fridge that start to look like a weird biology experiment? No way, keep that stuff out of there.

Moving on to the kitchen sink? This will be hard for me; I can’t say I’ve been overly conscious about food stuff that I put down the sink … So, I’ll have to be better at remembering that nothing goes down except for water and soap.  That grease from the bacon pan? Either use paper towels to soak it up and wipe it down or better yet scoop it out when it’s hard and put it in an old tin can … Coffee grounds? Well, these are really good in the garden, especially around hydrangea bushes and things like blueberries that like the acidity.

Of course it goes without saying that chemicals should never ever go down the toilet or sink – that means no bleach! Bleach will kill off all of the good bacteria that the septic system needs to break down the waste and keep it running well. Not to mention you’ll be contaminating the soil and that’s a hazard for everyone and everything – think of the butterflies, birds, bees and bugs. Always dispose of chemicals properly!  

For cleaning, I really love the products you can purchase at Nezza Naturals in Victoria (they ship in Canada and US!).

Or make your own! It’s so simple – lately I’ve been sprinkling baking soda and vinegar in the bathroom sink and shower to clean off soap scum – it works really well.  Lemon juice is also really great to use and it smells so nice and fresh.  You can cut a lemon in half and rub the juice on whatever area you are cleaning, squeeze out the extra juice and add it to a spray bottle that has water in it. Spray the sink or other surfaces as a disinfectant. 

Tea Tree Oil is also a really great alternative to bleach. It’s got a natural fresh scent. Just add a few drops of the oil in warm water in a spray bottle and spray any surface that needs a bit of disinfectant.

Vinegar isn’t quite as pleasant in terms of scent but with its acidic properties it makes for a great cleaning product. Again just put into a spray bottle mixed with water and start cleaning.  You can also add a bit of vinegar to your laundry – it’ll help brighten your clothes and cut through any soap residue.  Try pouring a little bit in your machine next time you do a load (not too much – you don’t want to smell like a chip shop!)

I’ve never used it myself but I hear that Castile soap is a great alternative to bleach.  It’s made with olive oil – dilute it with water and use it to scrub bathrooms, dishes and floors. You can also add it to your laundry as a detergent by adding vinegar, and baking soda.

I’ll end this poopy post with a funny story shared to me by my septic system installer.  A customer called him up complaining of a blocked septic pipe.  He went to check it out and ended up having to use a long stick or tool to poke at an obstruction.  He poked and poked and then suddenly realized that the blockage was breaking up, and breaking up fast.  He had just enough time to turn and run before a poop geyser shot poop into the sky nearly covering him in s#@t. 

When he spoke to the home owner, he asked if they used dry laundry detergent – oh no said he, never … long pause … oh… except, a few years ago my wife decided she’d make her own so, yeah, I guess we did for a time.  

So final tip, do not use dry powder for dishwasher or laundry or you might just create a poop geyser of your own.

That’s it, that’s all I’m going to say about poop (for now… until I get chickens).

The Farm… at Raven’s Perch

The plan for the farm is evolving and after a really amazing site visit with Hailey Troock from Young Agrarians we decided it would be a good idea to take it slow (opposite to my… let’s just do it NOW default way of thinking)… We are in the final stages of our building process and there is still a lot of time, effort and money required on that front so it doesn’t make sense to spread ourselves too thin by tackling this part of the project at this time. Therefore, this summer we will take the time to connect with those who have expressed interest in being apart of this opportunity, and if that is YOU please contact Hailey (info in her blog post linked below). Once fall arrives we will focus on getting the soil prepped and plant a winter rye crop to help build the soil up. By next April we’ll start getting things ready for the growing season!! Then the real fun begins, can’t wait to get my hands dirty!

Of course a lot will happen between fall and spring. We will need to meet up with those who are going to be living on the land and working the farm with us so that we can do some brainstorming and planning on design as well as discuss all the details involved with co-existing on the property as a healthy and happy community of like-minded people.

Over the winter I personally plan on spending a lot amount of time studying permaculture (I’ve had a book on my wish list for a long time that I’ll pick up soon called Gaia’s Garden by Toby Hemenway). I will also be sifting through the abundance of the amazing farming and business resources provided on the Young Agrarians site.

Hailey’s blog post explains our opportunity very well, and includes her contact information if you are interested in applying… check it out!

There seems to be a real wave of interest directed towards farming right now. There is a greater interest in taking control of one’s own food source and I think it is one positive outcome of this very strange and bizarre situation that we find ourselves in in 2020. Here’s a challenge for you, whether you have acreage, a front and/or back yard, access to a local allotment garden or even a balcony – see what you can grow this summer!

I want it now!

Surrender has certainly been a theme throughout this entire building process. I should have mastered it by now but I still find my self getting caught up in the “OMG the sky is falling!” moments. Yes I meditate, yes I do yoga and walk and do self-care, but sometimes things hit you like a wave and you feel completely tossed around and spit out onto the rocky beach – ouch!

“Don’t seek to have events happen as you wish, but wish them to happen as they do happen and all will be well with you.”

Epictetus

The second Nomad shipment arrived with what we are now calling The Nest (the vacation rental) and work began. Then, after only the first day it became apparent that some of the building pieces were not for our build but for a shipment that went to someone else in the area. We had some of theirs, they had some of ours… the logistics of getting the pieces swapped set us back a week which is a pretty big deal at this point of the project! Events were not happening as I wished at all and I did not feel well, not in the least.

We’ve been getting into Stoicism lately and this Epictetus quote reminded me to surrender to what was happening in the moment – not to project what I wanted to be but what was, right here, right now. If we can achieve that state of mind during any challenge we might face, we can at least find peace of mind – and to know that no matter what, all will be well.

This coming week work begins again and when the next obstacle or challenge arrives, which inevitably it will, I will remember this quote.

Joining the Tiny House Movement… almost there!

The tiny house movement is more than just living in a small home (generally considered to be a space less than 400 square feet), it’s an architectural, social and environmentally conscious movement – it’s the ultimate lifestyle choice if you have the minimalist mindset.

A tiny house is either stationary and built on a foundation or it moveable and is built wheels. Many are taking a crack at building their own and it’s incredible to see, that is the way to really keep costs down! On shows like Living Big in a Tiny House you get to see the amazingly creative ideas that people are coming up with!

The tiny house movement is really a unique community and I love how the Vancouver Island based tiny home builder Rewild Homes has built a really great site with tons of resources including BC Land Listings for those looking for a place to park their homes (we have space on our land if you’re interested! Check out this link and if you want to apply fill out an application form here).

Whether you are trying to find a place to park your tiny house on wheels … or if you are planning to build a tiny home with a foundation – it is important to do your research. Many municipalities do not allow it and it can be a real challenge to get permits to build. It’s a bit mind blowing to think that even if you own your property you may not be permitted to build a tiny house on it… wow!

We got incredibly lucky with our piece of property as there are (currently) no zoning restrictions in place that would limit our ability to build a smaller than usual home. Even so, we had to spend a lot of time talking to the local permit office and insurance companies to make our plans understood and accepted. Hopefully if people get a little more vocal the laws will begin to relax and become more flexible…

We chose Nomad Micro Homes because they are architecturally beautiful, they are sustainably built and because they are affordable. Another reason is that the design is adaptable for a variety of needs and this was very important to us.

My post in November showed the concrete footings poured and power/water lines buried. Also, the first shipment of two of the three cubes that will make up our home and guest suite were delivered. Then came a) snow and b) the holiday season. Patience, this is my mantra!

Now we have an amazing power/water pump ‘shack’. It is steel clad which is really important in this environment where forest fires are a real threat. Seeing this structure in place was an exciting day for us, to see something physically built on our property!

Even though we have chosen to have our home on a foundation and will build some outbuildings such as a cold storage and perhaps a work-out space, our home itself is about 340 square feet with two sleeping lofts. We are both passionate about living with a minimal amount of “things” so we do our best to make very conscious purchases. I think our main weakness is books and we have quite a few between us!

Now that the second shipment arrived, the suite can now be framed up. Once it’s at the same stage as the main home then all of the finishing work will progress with both. The final push!!

Adapting to the new norm

In my last post I shared thoughts on how being adaptable can help us to navigate through stressful times and how learning to be ok with change can help us to be calm and respond to situations despite the fear or uncertainty that we may feel. To seek out solutions instead of focusing on what is wrong.  We may even find that we learn how to thrive during times such as these.

The way that we carry out almost every activity in our daily life has changed in such a short period of time, and just the other day I encountered a new one. Our bank appraiser came by the property to asses the progress made on our home in order that funds from my construction loan may be released to me. He let us know ahead of time that because of the COVID-19 situation, he is only permitted to perform drive-by viewings from the road, he can’t actually drive or step onto the property.

When he arrived, we spoke to him from across the road and he instructed us on what photographs he’d need to see in order for him to complete his report. Below are some of the photos we took and you’ll see a lot of work has taken place in the past month. The siding is completed, the windows are in, the roof on and soffits installed. Last week the electricians made a lot of progress and this week I believe the plumber is coming in. Then begins the fun stuff like drywall!

Adaptability and embracing change has been my friend throughout the length of this project and we still have several months to go. So many delays and moving timelines to manage along with the tedious and often stressful task of juggling finances. The money aspect is one which has forced us to re-evaluate the original plan again and again … and yet again. Sure there is stress within this process and yes I have shed tears of frustration at times wondering if I had bitten off more than I could chew. However I truly believe that with each requirement to change we have come to the most incredible way forward and I don’t think we would have got here without everything “negative” and “challenging” that has happened along the way!

We are very fortunate to have a property outside the ALC which allows us to be creative and to play with lots of different possibilities. The part of the property that is down the hill and through the cedar forest from where we are building the Nomads is a big beautiful open field. Some of our ideas have been to find a partner to build a boutique micro-brewery. Another was to build a really cool house on stilts like the Sol-Duc. We also thought about building several live/work studio homes for people in the area, or a business centre for the local community.

And then… COVID-19 came along and here we now are at the end of March in a Brave New World, the strangest of days. So within a few weeks and with all the uncertainty surrounding everyone and everything, all of the plans that we had considered got thrown out the window and we had to re-evaluate our plan.

One morning, about a week ago, while I was doing my idea machine “workout” I had the seed of a thought which, while later brainstorming it with Steve, germinated into something fabulous – the idea to marry my love of tiny homes with my interest in permaculture gardening together to build something for ourselves and for the greater community. The plan to invite between 3 – 5 experienced permaculture designers/ farmers who will park their own off-grid tiny home on wheels on our property began coming together.

lower field

Then the question became… how? How do we reach out to find these people? Where to begin? Well, about a year ago I had joined the Young Agrarians organization and while I hadn’t been actively participating I did remember that they have a B.C. Land Matching Program so I started by reaching out to them. The other part of this plan involved reaching out to ReWild Homes, a builder of tiny home on wheels located on Vancouver Island. They have a resources page which includes a lands listing for tiny home owners to find a place to park their homes. I’ve connected with two amazing human beings who are helping me to make this dream a reality!

The vision and plan is to bring like minded people together to build a model or blueprint for sustainable living. We must change the way we live, it has become so apparent in these last few months that we must not, for the sake of this planet, continue being consumer focused and that we need to take control of our local food sources – to become more self sufficient.

We human beings are only stewards of this land, we don’t “own” it, we are only temporarily taking care of it for the next generation as well as for all of the creatures great and and small that share the land with us. It’s shocking – in a horrible but also good way – to see the beneficial affects of the slow down of industry is having on our planet. Blue skies and clear waters in places around the globe where this hasn’t been the case for as long as local residents can remember.

I believe it behoves us to take this global life altering situation that we’ve found ourselves in and make a change for the better – however that might look for you. To go back to the way things were just doesn’t, in my mind, seem to be an option! If you were to change just one thing, what would it be?

I’ll get off my soap box now but leave you this a final note: if you, or someone you know, is a farmer (particularly versed in permaculture) who wants to participate in realizing this vision I have for our Winlaw property, you will share in the harvest, sell at an onsite weekly market and have the opportunity to run workshops and lectures on the property to demonstrate the value and importance of permaculture gardening. If you are interested in participating in any way with this project please feel free to reach out, send me an email at info@ravensperch.co.

On being adaptable

We humans are experiencing a very strange time right now and I think we can all agree that this event will have everlasting ramifications on almost every aspect of our lives.  I believe that some of the changes will be very positive and some perhaps not so much – time will tell.  

In light of this reality we find ourselves in it makes me contemplate how we must now, more than ever, learn to be adaptable and cultivate the ability to go with the flow and change quickly. Adaptability to change is going to be a very useful skill to have and there are a lot of really great books out there that offer up tools on how to achieve this skill. One that I’ve got on my “to read” list is AdaptAbility: How to Survive Change You Didn’t Ask For.   

I have a sense that there are business owners of all descriptions who at some stage during this challenging time may make the call to adjust their whole way of doing business or perhaps even make the jump to a new career based on new arising societal changes.  

Change is inevitable, the only constant in this life, this world, is change. Every breath we take we are a different person and the more we accept and surrender to this fact the less stress, anxiety and fear we will have.  When we accept that change is inevitable we can more easily respond to challenges with clarity of thought. 

As you know I have a great interested in numerology and astrology – I’m also fascinated by personality tests such as Myers Briggs and Insights. Because of these interests, and with respect to all that is going on right now I have a) a pretty good sense of my self and what makes me tick and b) an awareness of others and what makes them tick.  

Because of my personality “type” I know that for the most part, I find change stimulating. Also the idea of being in a room full of people brainstorming and coming up with ideas and solutions to a problem is an exciting prospect for me.  On the flip side, I know that spending long periods of time focusing on detailed work isn’t exactly a stimulating prospect … I can do the detailed work if need be but only for short periods of time.

The person on the complete opposite spectrum to me would want to take time on their own to analyze the details and research all the options in depth. This person would not be comfortable with having to make split decisions and would find being pushed to make quick changes disconcerting and stressful.

With this current situation pushing people into potentially very uncomfortable places it is interesting to see the different ways in which we respond/react. Will we struggle more or will be struggle less, will we look at it as an opportunity to shake things up, will we see things in a positive light and seek solutions or will be focus on the negative and only see the problems?

Surrendering to changing situations can help manage those stressful anxious feelings that can sometimes overwhelm us. If you’re someone who typically struggles with change but would like to become more adaptable to help cope, you could try making some small changes in your day-to-day life. For instance, if you always walk or drive to work/ grocery store/ rec centre/ friends house the same way each time, maybe try taking a different route from time to time. If your immediate response to a suggestion from friend, manager, partner is “no” or “I don’t think so”, maybe try saying “yes” or at least “I’ll think about it”. Look for circumstances in your life where your go to response would typically be to dig heels in and switch it around. You might surprise yourself and you may find that you become more willing and accepting of changes than inevitable come your way. In stressful and challenging times becoming a little less stuck in usual patterns can help us to see beyond our fears.

Those are just some thoughts that have been swimming around in my brain while being essentially house bound. In my next post I’ll be sharing my journey through adaptability with respect to property development.

I hope everyone out there is doing well and taking care of yourself and loved ones (human and furry).

NOTE: The example that I presented above with respect to personality types is a generalization of only two types. It is important to never pigeon hole anyone based on personality tests… they’re just tools to help us better understand our self and others … and ultimately to best serve our self and others with more understanding and compassion.